APA -Evidence-based Research

Peer reviewed articles are listed below for APA approved courses for both the Seattle and San Diego conferences:

March 5-7, 2019 Seattle Course Offerings

The following courses are offered for 6.5 CE Credits-intermediate level.  Supportive, peer-review articles are listed under each course offered for APA CE credits; this research supports the learning objectives for each course.

Course Offered for APA CE credits: # 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28 & 30.

Course #1 & 11– The SCERTS Model: A Comprehensive Educational Approach for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Related Developmental Disabilities-Part 1 & 2 by Barry M. Prizant, PhD, CCC-SLP, Providence, RI

Course Objectives:

Identify five critical developmental underpinnings for the domains of the SCERTS model and the curriculum components of the model

Adequately describe the SCERTS domains, focusing on social communication, emotional regulation and transactional supports

Identify three aspects of the research foundations Identify three aspects of the SCERTS model’s core values and guiding principles.

Identify two characteristics of the SCERTS assessment process

Identify two guidelines for linking assessment findings to intervention goals in the SCERTS model

Dr Prizant Peer-review Journal Articles -Supportive Documentation

Course #2, 12 & 22 – The Integration of Trauma-Informed Approaches and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports Framework-Part 1, 2 and 3 by Lynne DeSousa, MS, School Psychologist, Denver, CO

Course Objectives:

Adequately describe trauma and toxic stress

Describe how trauma impacts staff and students in the learning environment

Adequately describe the critical features of PBIS

Adequately explain how to meet the needs of students using PBIS within the Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) framework

Define trauma-sensitive schools

Identify the critical features of PBIS and how those features align with Trauma Informed Approaches

DeSousa-Peer Reivewed Articles-Supportive Documentation

Course #3 – Use the Power of Mindsets to Transform Behavior and Teaching by MaryAnn Brittingham, MS, Family and Child Counseling, Pine Bush, NY

Course Objectives:

Adequately demonstrate how to identify mindsets

Describe techniques to empower students’ and teachers’ learning by teaching brain functions

Describe three key ways mindsets are developed

Demonstrate strategies to decrease the fear of mistakes and increase student participation

Demonstrate strategies designed to convert stresses to challenges and to promote positive emotional climate

Demonstrate positive mindset strategies to promote learning goals and resilience

Brittingham-PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES FOR Supportive Documentation

Course #4 & 14 – iPad Boot Camp: Awesome New iPad Apps, Adaptations and Accessories-Part 1 and 2  by Therese Willkomm, PhD, ATP, Durham, NH

Course Objectives:

Identify at least 10 different built in features on an iPad to support students who experience various disabilities

Identify at least five resources for finding appropriate apps for specific functional limitations

Describe how to use the SETT framework when electing an appropriate app

Describe five different ways to access the iPad for physical limitations

Build a multiuse iPad holder

Build a scan and read station to support an iPad for students who experience print disabilities

Fabricate a tactile overlay for GarageBand for vision impairments

Build an adaptive stylus for someone who is unable to hold a stylus

(second day objectives)

Identify and describe 10 different uses of the iPad camera for physical, sensory, communication or cognitive limitations

Identify three different ways to interact with the iPad or iPhone without ever touching the device

Describe a five minute solution for creating an adaptive keyguard for a communication app

Identify at least five apps and iPad accessories to support students who experience executive function impairments

Identify and describe at least five apps and adaptation for deaf and hard of hearing

Identify and describe at least five apps for self regulation

Identify and describe at least five mounting solutions for a wheelchair, table, bed or floor

Willkomm -Supportive Peer-Reviewed Documentation

Course #5 and 15 – Combining Sensory and Mindfulness Strategies to Reduce Behavior Issues and Anxiety-Part 1 & 2 by Bek Miremis, OTR/L, Seattle, WA

Course Objectives:

Define sensory processing and integration
Demonstrate behavioral manifestations of “sensory kids”

Distinguish between “sensory kids” and expected developmental behavior

Differentiate between “sensory” and “behavior” issues Demonstrate sensory strategies for the classroom

Describe how mindfulness and sensory strategies are mutually beneficial

(day 2) Define and describe “mindfulness”

Adequately describe the mechanisms and science of mindfulness

Describe how mindfulness relates to sensory processing

Demonstrate the self-practice of mindfulness exercises

Demonstrate three ways to implement mindfulness in the classroom or home environment

Demonstrate how to write mindfulness into IEPs and behavior plans

Miremis Supportive Peer-reviewed-Documentation APA articles

Course #7 & 17 – Promoting and Coaching Executive Functioning in the Classroom-Part 1 and 2 by Shannon Kuschel, MS, LPC, PCET, National Institute for Learning Development, Suffolk, VA

Course Objectives:

Explain why executive functions are now more important than ever in the 21st century classroom

Identify the key components of executive functioning

Describe the process of executive functioning development

Identify your own learning style and executive functioning profile, and explain the steps to facilitating executive functioning in students

Describe specific strategies to foster metacognition, self-efficacy, motivation, and persistence

Collaboratively discuss how to create a classroom culture that promotes executive functioning development

Demonstrate specific classroom strategies that utilize and develop student executive functioning skills

(day 2)

Describe how to use an executive functioning assessment and other materials instrumental in coaching executive functioning development with students

Discuss the value of correspondence training and keys to success in its use in coaching students

Discuss the value of goal setting and keys to success in its use in coaching students

Describe self-regulated learning and the importance of motivation in the learning process

Discuss the keys to successful enhancement of student motivation

Discuss the characteristics of effective executive functioning coaches

Demonstrate how to develop personal goals related to becoming effective executive functioning coaches specific to classroom or other learning environments

Kuschel- executive functioning Supportive Peer-Reviewed Documentation-APA

Course #9 – Dyslexia: What It Is, What It Is Not and How to Help by Kelli Sandman-Hurley, EdD and Tracy Block-Zaretsky, BA, Dyslexia Training Institute, San Diego, CA

Course Objectives:

Correctly define dyslexia

Identify three appropriate accommodations for students with dyslexia

Demonstrate two appropriate interventions for dyslexia

Adequately describe the role of executive function in reading

Describe the underlying structure of English orthography and understand how that knowledge can improve instruction

Identify at least three myths about dyslexia and be able to dispel those myths

APA support Peer-reviewed articles -Dyslexia Sandman_Hurley

Course #10 – Instructional Considerations for Implementing MTSS: Improving the Performance of Students Who Are At Risk for Academic Failure by Marcy Stein, PhD, University of Washington Tacoma and William Rasplica, MS, Consultant

Course Objectives:

Identify the essential components of an MTSS framework

Identify the essential components of systematically designed instruction

Identify effective screening practices
Identify effective progress monitoring practices

Identify criteria for evaluating the instructional practices found in published literacy curricula

Identify criteria for evaluating the instructional practices found in published math curricula

Identify non-curricular evidence-based practices commonly used to differentiate instruction within an MTSS framework

Stein Rasplica-Supportive Peer-Reviewed References

Course #13 – Getting through a Crisis without Making it Worse: ACT instead of React by MaryAnn Brittingham, MS, Family and Child Counseling, Consultant, Pine Bush, NY

Course Objectives:

Describe the impact of stress in both their own lives and in the lives of their students

Describe the basis of anger

Describe strategies to identify and manage counter-aggression in a conflict

Describe how to develop mindful practices to improve emotional regulation

Adequately explain the conflict cycle and the role you play in the cycle

Describe strategies to improve your attending and communication skills

Brittingham- PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES FOR REHAB2019

Course #18 – Practical Management of Tough Kids: An Evidence-Based Approach by William Jenson, PhD, Educational & Child Psychologist, University of Utah

Course Objectives:

Provide a practical educational definition of “tough kids” that includes the externalizing behavioral excesses of aggression, noncompliance, arguing the behavioral deficits of self-management and social skills

Demonstrate an assessment process for “tough kids” that is linked to classroom interventions

Describe the basic causes of the “tough kid” problem behaviors, particularly the coercive process.

Explain which problematic behaviors decrease with time and which are stable and require intervention

Identify “Keystone” behaviors and their importance in managing “tough kids”

Describe the standards for evidence-based interventions and which interventions harm “tough kids”

Describe proactive classroom strategies to avoid later problematic behaviors such as precision requests

Explain how to increase positive reinforcement in classrooms with unique and practical procedures

Describe the components of an all positive, whole school management system, The Principal’s 200 Club

William Jenson Peer Reviewed Supportive articles

Course #21 – Behavioral Assessment and Treatment of Students that Exhibit Self-Injurious Behavior and Related Disorders by Timothy Vollmer, PhD, BCBA, Gainesville, FL

Course Objectives:

Specify potential sources of reinforcement maintaining self-injurious behavior among individuals with autism and related disabilities

Describe the empirical evidence supporting the notion that self-injury and related disorders are learned (operant) forms of behavior

Describe the development of treatments based on differential reinforcement

Describe models for staff and parent training

Vollmer Peer reviewed articles

Course #23 – Science to Practice: Understanding and Supporting Preschool Child Development in Literacy, Mathematics, and Social-Emotional Learning by Kristen Missall, PhD, University of WA

See page 2 of reading list for peer-reviewed articles

Course Objectives:

Define school readiness and key determinants

Describe social-emotional development of preschool-aged children

Describe best practices for supporting social-emotional development in preschool and consider personal experiences and needs for supporting preschool-aged children

Explain the science of the development of early literacy skills, including trajectory of development and associated risks

Describe best practices for supporting early literacy development in preschool

Explain how early mathematics skills develop up to and just beyond preschool years

Describe how to support early mathematics development through exploration of evidence-based practices and personal experiences and needs

Missall -Peer -reviewed Supportive Documentation-Reading List

Course #24 – Creating Assistive Technology Solutions in Minutes by Therese Willkomm, PhD, ATP, Durham, NH

Course Objectives:

Describe at least 10 different everyday items that can be used to create solutions in minutes for students with disabilities

Identify and describe at least 10 different materials that can be used to fabricate hundreds of solutions in minutes

Describe at least 10 solutions that can be made in minutes to accommodate for students who experience vision or hearing impairments

Describe at least five solutions that can be made in minutes to accommodate for students who experience autism

Describe at least five solutions that can be made in minutes to accommodate for students who experience mobility impairments

Describe at least five solutions that can be made in minutes to accommodate for students who experience grasping and holding impairments

Describe at least five solutions that can be made in minutes to accommodate for students who experience communication impairments

Willkomm Peer Reivewed Documentation-APA articles

Course #27 – Mind the Gap! Neuroscience & Education by Shannon Kuschel, MS, LPC, PCET, National Institute for Learning Development, Suffolk, VA

Course Objectives:

Adequately discuss the unique roles of the neuroscientist and educator as it relates to promoting student learning

Provide examples of the intersection of neuroscience and education

Discuss the impact of neuroimaging on teaching methods

Describe important themes from neuro- and cognitive sciences that educators should know

Discuss learning mechanisms that contribute to brain development and effective classroom learning

Incorporate learning mechanisms in instructional delivery and classroom practices

Collaboratively discuss goals, challenges and strategies for bridging neuroscience and education

Adequately describe the Brain Targeted Teaching Model, explain how it relates to their classroom or learning environment, and demonstrate the ability to develop goals for implementation

APA- Day 3 Neuroscience-Peer Reviewed Supportive Documentation

Course #28 – Advanced Tough Kid Behavior Management Techniques, Reductive Techniques, Social Skills, On-Task in a Box and the Electronic Homenote by William Jenson, PhD, Educational & Child Psychologist, University of Utah

Course Objectives:

Provide a practical educational definition of “tough kids” that includes the externalizing behavioral excesses
of aggression and noncompliance, while arguing the behavioral deficits of self-management and social skills

Define evidence-based practice

Describe reductive techniques and the cautions in their use

Explain response cost, time out, in-school suspension and think time

Describe the Superheroes Social Skills program and its implementation

Describe the On-Task in a Box self-management program and how to implement it

Describe the Electronic Homenote program and how to implement it

William Jenson -Peer Reviewed supportive documentation-APA articles

Course #30 – Culturally Responsive Teaching: Closing the Opportunity Gap by Caprice D. Hollins, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist, Cultures Connecting, Renton, WA

Course Objectives:

Identify three tools for engaging in on-going courageous conversations about race and equity

Adequately describe the complexity of addressing racial equity in education and be able to articulate why this is personally important

Discuss how to develop a common framework, language and understanding of cultural competence

Describe the impact of stereotypes, stereotype threat and implicit biases in schools

Identify four strategies to counter implicit bias and stereotype threat

Demonstrate how to utilize a screening tool to analyze curriculum materials for ageism, sexism, racism, ableism and heterosexism

Caprice Hollins-Peer-reviewed supportive documentation- APA


May 8-10, 2019 San Diego Course Offerings

The following courses are offered for 6.5 CE Credits (Intermediate Level): Course # 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, & 18.

COURSE #1- How Emotion Impacts the Brain’s Successful Learning, What to Do About It & How to Build Powerful Executive Functions by Dr. Judy Willis, MD, MEd, Board, Certified Neurologist

Course Objectives:

Adequately describe the impact of emotions and stress on learning and how to unlock the stress blockage

Adequately explain how the “video game model” applies to teaching for motivation and perseverance through achievable challenge

Demonstrate how to help students recognize incremental progress

Describe four strategies to reduce boredom and frustration that prevent the brain from working from its highest thinking and control centers

Design a plan to activate the critical executive function skillsets for their specific grade level and subject area

Describe how students’ increased strength of and access to executive functions will help them solve new problems and increase creativity

Course 1- Dr Willis- Peer-Reviewed supportive documentation

Course Objectives:

Course #2- Achieve Success with Defiant, Emotional, and Disengaged Students by MaryAnn Brittingham, MS, Family and Child Counseling, Pine Bush, NY

Adequately discuss how and why stress plays a part in our behavior

Identify the components of a win-win classroom Describe the four goals of misbehavior
Identify your response style

Adequately demonstrate skills to avoid turning conversations into arguments

List four techniques to address attention-seekers and power-seeking students

Adequately discuss the difference between interventions and consequences

Course #2- Achieve Success with Defiant

Course #5 & 11- Promoting and Coaching Executive Functioning in the Classroom by Shannon Kuschel, MS, LPC, PCET, NILD, Suffolk, VA (part 1 and 2)

Course Objectives:

Explain why executive functions are now more important than ever in the 21st century classroom

Identify the key components of executive functioning

Describe the process of executive functioning development

Identify your own learning style and executive functioning profile, and explain the steps to facilitating executive functioning in students

Describe specific strategies to foster metacognition, self-efficacy, motivation, and persistence

Collaboratively discuss how to create a classroom culture that promotes executive functioning development

Demonstrate specific classroom strategies that utilize and develop student executive functioning skills

(day 2)

Describe how to use an executive functioning assessment and other materials instrumental in coaching executive functioning development with students

Discuss the value of correspondence training and keys to success in its use in coaching students

Discuss the value of goal setting and keys to success in its use in coaching students

Describe self-regulated learning and the importance of motivation in the learning process

Discuss the keys to successful enhancement of student motivation

Discuss the characteristics of effective executive functioning coaches

Demonstrate how to develop personal goals related to becoming effective executive functioning coaches specific to classroom or other learning environments

Course #6 & 12- Combining Sensory and Mindfulness Strategies to Reduce Behavior Issues and Anxiety by Bek Miremis, OTR/L, Seattle, WA

Course Objectives:

Define sensory processing and integration
Demonstrate behavioral manifestations of “sensory kids”

Distinguish between “sensory kids” and expected developmental behavior

Differentiate between “sensory” and “behavior” issues Demonstrate sensory strategies for the classroom

Describe how mindfulness and sensory strategies are mutually beneficial

(day 2) Define and describe “mindfulness”

Adequately describe the mechanisms and science of mindfulness

Describe how mindfulness relates to sensory processing

Demonstrate the self-practice of mindfulness exercises

Demonstrate three ways to implement mindfulness in the classroom or home environment

Demonstrate how to write mindfulness into IEPs and behavior plans

Miremis Supportive Peer-reviewed -Documentation APA articles

Course #7- Capturing and Sustaining Learners’ Attention and Constructing Durable Long-term Memory by Dr. Judy Willis, MD, MEd, Board, Certified Neurologist

Course Objectives:

Adequately demonstrate classroom strategies to stimulate curiosity and increase attention

Adequately demonstrate how to promote predictions so all students remain active participants

Adequately describe how to use curiosity and prediction to capture and sustain students’ focused engagement to construct durable memories and negativity changes to motivation

Adequately explain what neuroscience research reveals about how the brain constructs physical links between new information and prior knowledge to successfully capture and retain learning

Adequately describe the latest research on neuroplasticity, dopamine-reward memory, and the power of patterning

Using the latest neuroscience research, adequately demonstrate classroom strategies to improve students’ attention and memory

Course 7- Dr Willis-Peer Reviewed Articles-Supportive Documentation

COURSE #8- Achieve Success with “I DON’T CARE” Students: Inspiring the Unmotivated by MaryAnn Brittingham, MS, Family and Child Counseling, Pine Bush, NY

Course Objectives:

Explain what is really behind the words of “I don’t care”

Explain why contracts and rewards don’t work with “I don’t care” students

Identify pitfalls of behavior plans and how to revise them to work

List four strategies for positive relationships with under-performing students

Adequately describe how to replace judgment with compassion

List four specific strategies to adjust your responses to help guide students toward their own behavior change

Demonstrate relationship/team building strategies you can easily incorporate into your classroom

Course #8-Achieve Success with I don’t care students-peer reviewed articles

Course #13- The Challenge of Challenging Behaviors! Understanding and Effectively Addressing the Behavioral Challenges of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
by Susan K. Lewis Stokes, MA, CCC-SLP, Autism Consultant, Bloomington, IN

Course Objectives:

Develop an understanding of the function of behaviors in students with ASD in relation to the neurological features and characteristics of ASD

Describe the behavioral impact of three core characteristics of ASD

Describe a system for identifying the source of challenging behaviors in relation to the features and characteristics
of ASD and identify subsequent evidence-based practices as positive behavioral interventions and supports to foster positive student behavioral change

List two web-based evidence-based practice resources specific to students with ASD

Identify two evidence-based practices used as positive behavioral intervention and supports to reduce the occurrence of challenging behaviors for students with ASD

Describe three ways to incorporate evidence-based practices for specific students as positive behavioral intervention and supports to reduce the occurrence of challenging behaviors for students with ASD

Course #13-Stokes Peer Reviewed journal articles

Course #14- Getting Through a Crisis without Making it Worse: ACT instead of Reactby MaryAnn Brittingham, MS, Family and Child Counseling, Pine Bush, NY

Course Objectives:

Describe the impact of stress in both your own lives and in the lives of your students

Describe the basis of anger

Describe strategies to identify and manage counter- aggression in a conflict

Describe how to develop mindful practices to improve emotional regulation

Adequately explain the conflict cycle and the role you play in the cycle

Describe strategies to improve your attending and communication skills

Course #14-Getting Through a Crisis Without Making it Worse--peer reviewed articles

COURSE #17 Mind the Gap! Neuroscience & Education by Shannon Kuschel, MS, LPC, PCET, National Institute for Learning Development, Suffolk, VA

Course Objectives:

Adequately discuss the unique roles of the neuroscientist and educator as it relates to promoting student learning

Provide examples of the intersection of neuroscience and education

Discuss the impact of neuroimaging on teaching methods

Describe important themes from neuro- and cognitive sciences that educators should know

Discuss learning mechanisms that contribute to brain development and effective classroom learning

Incorporate learning mechanisms in instructional delivery and classroom practices

Collaboratively discuss goals, challenges and strategies for bridging neuroscience and education

Adequately describe the Brain Targeted Teaching Model, explain how it relates to their classroom or learning environment, and demonstrate the ability to develop goals for implementation