Seattle Course #11-Capturing and Sustaining Learners’ Attention

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Thursday- March 8, 2018      8:00am-4:00pm

Course #11 –Capturing and Sustaining Learners’ Attention and Constructing Durable Long-term Memory

by Dr. Judy Willis, MD, MEd, Board-Certified Neurologist- Santa Barbara, CA

About the Speaker
 

Judy Willis, MD, MEd, a board-certified neurologist combined her 15 years as a practicing neurologist with ten subsequent years as a classroom teacher to become a leading authority in the neuroscience of learning. With her unique background both in neuroscience and education, she has written seven books and more than 100 articles about applying neuroscience research to classroom teaching strategies. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa as the first woman graduate from Williams College, Willis attended UCLA School of Medicine where she was awarded her medical degree. She remained at UCLA and completed a medical residency and neurology residency, including chief residency. She practiced neurology for 15 years before returning to university to obtain her teaching credential and Master of Education degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She then taught in elementary and middle school for 10 years. Dr. Willis is on the adjunct faculty of the University of California Santa Barbara Graduate School of Education and travels nationally and internationally giving presentations, workshops, and consulting about learning and the brain. She has been interviewed by USA Today, Euronews, The Wall Street Journal, NBC News Education Nation, ABC Australia Radio, Lateline Australia, Popular Mechanics, Neurology Today, USA Today, Education Week, Medscope Neurology, and Parenting Magazine among others, and writes staff expert blogs for NBC News Education Nation, Edutopia, Psychology Today, and The Guardian. In 2011 she was selected by Edutopia as a “Big Thinker on Education.” Disclosures: Financial- Dr. Willis is self-employed and receives teaching and speaker fees. There are no nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Target Audience (who should attend):  General Education Teachers, Special Education Teachers, Resource Room Teachers, Title 1 Teachers, Reading Specialists, School Psychologists, School Counselors, Behavior Specialists, Principals/Administrators, Case Managers, Social Workers, Speech-Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists, ELL Teachers, Math Teachers, Coaches, Autism Specialists, Private Tutors, and Instructional Assistants and Paraprofessionals

Target Age Range: Kindergarten through 21 years

Course Description:  

Experience the power of the “alien” that controls what information gets into your brain, and the brains of learners, not under voluntary control. You will literally experience your own attention filter and the limits of your control over which sensory input is selected to pass into your higher brain. Then you will learn what it takes to make the “cut” and how to use strategies to be sure learners’ brains “want to know what you have to teach”. Multimedia access has changed the way students attend to their environment. The digital age presents a new set of challenges, but neuroscience has revealed the stimuli and circumstances that grab and sustain the brain’s attention. Using strategies you already know in different ways, you will work smarter not harder, as you incorporate these “hooks” into your instruction. You will build strategies to stimulate curiosity and bring learners into class with high attention. You’ll discover how to promote predictions so all students remain active participants. Through the combination of curiosity and prediction you’ll capture and sustain students’ focused engagement as their brains construct durable memories and negativity changes to motivation. The application of the neuroscience research to teaching offers further keys to access the brain’s most powerful information processing networks to increase memory construction, accuracy, durability, and retrieval. You will learn what this research reveals about how the brain constructs physical links between new information and prior knowl- edge to successfully capture and retain learning. Topics including the latest research on neuroplasticity, dopa-mine-reward memory, and the power of patterning will be linked to ready-to-use relevant classroom strategies. Through neuroplasticity, the application of these developing networks to active and interactive learning strengthens their highest cognitive potentials. Students who construct their understanding and are guided to extend learning into concept neural networks will have wisdom that can be applied in school and transferred to new applications long after the school years. They will be prepared for the demands of vocations or higher education to adapt their understanding as facts change and will be creative innovators in response to the new problems and opportunities of the 21st century.

 

 What You Will Learn
Course Objectives– Participants will be able to:

• Adequately demonstrate classroom strategies to stimulate curiosity and increase attention

• Adequately demonstrate how to promote predictions so all students remain active participants

• Adequately describe how to use curiosity and prediction to capture and sustain students’ focused engagement to construct durable memories and negativity changes to motivation

• Adequately explain what neuroscience research reveals about how the brain constructs physical links between new information and prior knowledge to successfully capture and retain learning

• Adequately describe the latest research on neuroplasticity, dopamine-reward memory, and the power of patterning

• Using the latest neuroscience research, adequately demonstrate classroom strategies to improve students’ attention and memory